Category: Home Cleaning

Removing Sticky Carpet Tiles From Tile Floors

Not all of carpet tiles install with self-adhesives. Rather, many are installed with sticky carpet adhesive. Carpet tiles are a simple way to cover a tile flooring to modify the appearance of a room, but if you choose to remove the carpet tiles, you might discover a sticky mess. You may pull the rug tiles from your tile floors, but not all of the adhesive will remove using the tile, demanding one to remove the sticky adhesive before you can enjoy your tile flooring.

Insert a putty knife under a carpet tile border. Boost the border until you can grab it with your hand. Pull it from the tile flooring. Alternatively, if you have difficulty pulling the rug tile from the tile flooring, warm the rug tile to soften the adhesive, with a heat gun or hair dryer. Repeat this process for every single carpet tile.

Pour boiling water on a small area of tile to soften the rug glue residue left on the tiles. Allow the hot water sit for two minutes.

Scrape the softened glue residue from the ground, using the handheld steel scraper. Wipe the glue from the scraper blade after every pass, utilizing an old rag. Continue to soften the adhesive with boiling water. Scrape until you remove the majority of the glue from the tile flooring.

Mix 1 gallon of hot tap water with 1 cup of ammonia and one tsp. of liquid dishwashing detergent in a bucket. Slide the scouring pad to the ammonia mixure and bathe the tile flooring to remove the remaining sticky adhesive residue from the tile.

Rinse the tile floor with clean water to remove any traces of the ammonia mixture. Allow the tile floor to dry completely.

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How to Remove Rust From an Antique Table Lamp

If your vintage lamp is rusted, it has likely seen its fair share of humid days, because rust forms especially rapidly as soon as the air is moist. You can eliminate rust by rubbing it with a synthetic, like steel wool, however, that treatment is very likely to scratch a delicate antique. You can also dissolve rust using acid, while vinegar — combined with salt — is only strong enough to perform the job without harming the metal.

Disassemble the Lamp

To see to the rust, you have to immerse the lamp in vinegar, so it is important to strip it completely before you do that. After removing the shade and bulb, you also will need to eliminate the electrical components, including the wire and socket, so that goes into the vinegar solution is the metal base. You must see a screw which releases the socket from the base; once unscrewing it with a screwdriver and disengaging the socket, then unscrew the wire terminals and pull the wire out of the base of the lamp.

Earning the Vinegar Solution

You’ll need a plastic container deep enough to contain the whole lamp, and you want to fill it with sufficient vinegar to completely immerse it. Utilize the least-expensive distilled white vinegar you may find — no advantage will be had in making use of a gourmet manufacturer. Adding common table salt to make a saturated solution fortifies the vinegar and makes it work faster. To make a saturated solution, keep adding salt and stirring until no more salt will dissolve. A modest amount will remain on the base of he container, which is okay — just keep it out of direct contact with the lamp.

Dissolving the Rust

Depending on the extent of the rust, it could take anywhere from 2 to several hours for it to dissolve. Keep checking the lamp every hour or two, because the sooner you eliminate it from the solution, the less opportunity the vinegar has of etching and dulling the metal finish. When the rust is gone, it is important to neutralize the vinegar by washing the lamp thoroughly using an alkaline cleaner. To earn a suitable cleaner, add 2 tablespoons of baking soda to a gallon of water and then pour in a ounce of dishwashing detergent. Use the solution liberally with a sponge.

Removing a Small Rust Patch

If only a little pat of your lamp is affected by rust, you may use a trick to prevent the need to immerse it in vinegar. Make a paste with salt and vinegar and apply it liberally to the rust. Wait for it to dry; then brush it off and implement more if the rust remains observable. It is possible to make a scrubbable paste by combining the vinegar using borax — it won’t dissolve rust as quickly as the salt/vinegar alternative, but you are able to take advantage of the gentle abrasiveness of Borax by scrubbing with a soft cloth to hasten the aging removal procedure. Wash thoroughly using a neutralizing soap alternative when you are done.

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