Category: Eclectic Homes

The way to Fix a Loose Oven Handle to a Frigidaire FES367ABG

A loose oven handle can be both annoying and potentially dangerous when it prevents you from functioning the door reliably. The handle in your Frigidaire FES367ABG oven is attached to the door via a pair of screws located on the interior of the unit. In order to access and tighten the screws you have to get rid of the door and take off its interior panel.

Turn off power to the Frigidaire oven at your house’s circuit breaker panel. If you’re unsure which breaker controls your oven, turn off power to your whole home. When power is off, unplug the oven in the wall outlet to which it is linked.

Open the oven’s door to reveal its hinges. Support the doorway with a seat or your elbow, if needed, then slide the hinge locks outward to unlock them. Each hinge has its own lock.

Lift up the door and off in the oven and then lay it face-down on a flat, level surface. A table or the ground will suffice. Think about having a friend help you lift the doorway if you find it too heavy to transfer safely on your own.

Unfasten the screws around the inside edge of the doorway and place them apart. When all the screws are removed, gently lift the internal panel out of the doorway.

Examine the two door-handle screws located in the upper edge of the doorway. Look for corrosion, rust and other damage and, even if present, remove the screws and then replace them. If there is absolutely no damage, tighten the screws by turning them clockwise with a screwdriver until the handle is no longer loose.

Reseat the internal panel in the doorway and refasten the screws before the panel is tight. Lift the door back into position, refasten the hinges and then slide the hinge locks back into position.

Test the handle to make sure it is still tight, verify that the door opens and closes properly and then plug the oven back into the wall outlet and turn the power back on at the circuit breaker.

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What kind of Paint Can I Utilize Bathroom Wainscoting?

If you’re planning on lining bathroom walls using wainscoting, you need to protect it from moisture. You don’t have to utilize oil-based or exterior paint, though; inside latex paint works well while aiding the paneling look its best.

Mildewcide and Primer

The walls in a bathroom, especially those around the tub and tub, are subjected to condensation and humidity, and many semi-gloss latex paints can defy that. They will better withstand the mold that can grow in such circumstances, however, if you include a mildewcide into the top coat. Since wainscoting is made from wood or fiberboard, you can’t get away with a self-priming paint. A shellac- or latex-based wood tip is critical to seal the grain and improve adhesion. Tinting the primer can help avoid the need for multiple top coats.

Finish With Latex Paint or Polyurethane

Generally, semi-gloss wall paint is durable enough to handle the requirements in a regular bathroom, however not all bathrooms are average. If yours has poor ventilation or you have had previous difficulties with peeling paint and mold, your wainscoting may require a coat of full-gloss latex enamel to correctly protect it. You may prefer to stain the wainscoting as opposed to painting it. If so, safeguard the stain with clear polyurethane; water- and solvent-based products are equally acceptable.

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Sustainable Living in 196 Square Feet

Chris and Malissa Tack did not believe they had been living in surplus. Content in their 800-square-foot apartment they had everything that they wanted. However, a spontaneous crash course in small living changed their minds. Turns out, they could want less.

Following weeks of planning and more than 800 hours of building, the couple had a new residence, with 133 square feet of living area plus a 63-square-foot sleeping loft above the kitchen. Set to a 20- by 81/2-foot trailer, the house feels comfy, comfortable and anything but cramped. “We believe that small living boosts living within your means,” says Chris. “That may be a great option for many men and women.”

in a Glance
Who lives here: Chris and Malissa Tack
Location: Snohomish, Washington
Size: 133 square feet of living area plus a 63-square-foot sleeping attic

The Very Small Tack House

The Tacks installed solar panels to power the home, although they can connect into the local grid if necessary. As a result of the panels along with the couple’s low electricity requirements, the solar array meets most (if not all) of the couple’s power needs during the summer. In the winter they spend only $1 per day on electricity.

The home sits on a 5-acre home with a different home and a studio apartment. The couple pays the owner of this parcel to the right to park their home here and also to utilize the washer, dryer and a nearby toilet.

The Very Small Tack House

Since the few employs another toilet on the property, the only water that leaves their home is graywater in the sink and shower. “We are very conscientious of these goods we use for cleaning and bathing,” says Chris. “That which we use is biodegradable”

The Very Small Tack House

The front door opens to a joint live-work space. Malissa, who works in 3-D design, planned the entire home herself. “When building such a small area, particularly on a trailer where you have fairly set measurements, you’ve got a certain amount of creative freedom,” says Chris.

The Tacks did everything they could to decrease power use and help save space. Each the lights use LED bulbs. Malissa’s computer monitor doubles as a television, cutting back on accessories, power and unnecessary space. Her desk folds down when not being used.

The Very Small Tack House

A 9- by 7-foot sleeping attic sits above the kitchen and bathroom on the other side of the home. The attic fits the couple’s queen mattress perfectly, using a floor-to-ceiling height of just 41 inches in the peak. Dormers provide a little extra headroom on the sides.

The Very Small Tack House

The residence is filled with smart storage options, such as this storage seat in the living room. Chris designed it so it may be taken away entirely, if necessary. “Since we had never lived in such a small space before, we didn’t know what unforeseen factors could prompt us need to utilize the space differently,” he says.

The Very Small Tack House

Natural materials keep the home safe and ecofriendly. Wool insulation in the walls and subfloor keep a consistent temperature, while a tung oil coating protects the pine walls without the risk of off-gassing.

The Very Small Tack House

Of course, moving from an 800-square-foot apartment to less than 200 square feet meant the Tacks had to radically decrease their possessions. “It was not as hard as we thought it would be,” Chris says. “There were books and magazines of mine that we’d moved into Michigan, to New York City and then across the nation to Washington. It seemed quite silly, if you consider it.”

The few hung on to their favorites and must-haves, and then donated nearly everything else to Goodwill, simply selling a few bigger items on Craigslist.

The Very Small Tack House

The kitchen was the toughest part of the home to design. Initially the couple wanted to fit an oven to the space, however they installed a simple two-burner propane cooktop, very similar to what is used on ships, rather.

The Very Small Tack House

Because the kitchen is really near the toilet, the Tacks installed only one sink in the kitchen to the entire home.

The Very Small Tack House

The owner of the property is a licensed plumber and electrician; he also helped Chris and Malissa determine the installation for their own kitchen and toilet. They built a special spot for their cat’s litter box to the left of this composting toilet.

The Very Small Tack House

The shower is a classic oak wine barrel, sawed in half. After each shower, they carefully rinse it out with fresh water and remove any extra water using a sponge to keep the unsealed wood in good shape.

The tiny house gets its water supply in the habit 38-gallon steel water tank. An electric water heater can be wired into a switch, so the few can turn it on just when they need hot water.

The Very Small Tack House

An integrated cabinet retains all their hanging clothes and Chris’ camera gear.

The Very Small Tack House

The couple left a very simple but enchanting outdoor dining set from pallets.

Know more about making furniture out of pallets

The Very Small Tack House

Chris and Malissa would be the first to admit that living in a tiny house is not for everybody, but they are pleased to dedicate to their living situation for the time being. They plan to stay in the tiny home for at least another three to five decades and then will build something a little larger — around 300 square feet.

More: A Tiny, Joyful, Ecofriendly Home

Read more innovative small homes

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Find Patio Party Style

When the weather is fine, it is time to take the party outside. Whether you love planning elaborate menus and decor, or prefer simple last-minute cocktails with friends, the important thing is finding the fete to suit your style. Get inspired by these eight outdoor party ideas, from beachy cocktails into just desserts.

McGuire Furniture Company

1. Chill in an outdoor living area. Make your patio cozier by attracting a few home comforts outside. Roll out a rug, plump up the sofa with additional pillows and maintain a gentle toss within reach.

If you’re short on outdoor furniture, then haul a few pieces out from your living room briefly — sitting real furniture outside feels luxurious.

Molly Wood Garden Design

2. Sun bleached and beachy. Conjure a summery mood with pale tones of sand and white. Hang white drapes or suspend fabric overhead to give coverage from sunlight. Decorate the table with white shells, hurricanes filled with sand and miniature tea lights.

Scot Eckley, Inc..

3. Italian or French style, outdoor dining. Draw inspiration in the Italian and French customs for long, leisurely lunches al fresco. Set out large platters of simple, seasonal foods household fashion, along with wine from glass carafes.

Maintaining a basket of essentials (shades, straw hats, sunscreen) available for guests to grab as required is a thoughtful touch.

The Cousins

Tip: Make the celebration budget friendly. Hit budget-friendly stores such as Ikea and Target to stock up on party supplies in goes-with-everything white. Paper lanterns, string lights and candles set the mood, along with an inexpensive set of dishes and unbreakable cups will see you through several parties. Give a basic picnic table a DIY upgrade by stenciling words onto the surface.

APLD, Susan Cohan

4. Tropical takeout. Who says you have to cook to throw an awesome party? Purchase from your favorite neighborhood restaurant instead and concentrate your effort on the decoration.

A coffee table placed on vibrant outdoor mats and surrounded with floor cushions creates a fun spot for a small dinner party to congregate at. Set out brilliant parasols, lanterns, potted succulents and sculptures or other artwork borrowed from inside.

Margie Grace – Grace Design Associates

5. Homegrown-edibles swap. Get with garden-loving friends for a party that celebrates the bounty of the year. Invite guests to bring something they’ve grown, picked or made from scratch — by a basket of ideal juicy tomatoes from their garden to jars of homemade jam or pickles, or even home-brewed beer.

MTLA- Mark Tessier Landscape Architecture

6. Australian cinema. With a small projector (either bought or leased) and a notebook, it is possible to display a movie right on your backyard. For a classy evening, set up tables outdoors and show a foreign movie along with dinner.

For a twist spin, show an independent children’ picture and also follow up with s’mores around the fire pit. Check out the DVD listing in the New York International Children’s Film Festival for ideas.

7. Just desserts. When you’d really prefer to have people over, but dinner sounds like a lot of, host a dinner party instead. Invite friends to appear after dinner and then surprise them with an elegant dessert table set up on the terrace.

A few desserts, perhaps a cheese plate, plus tea and coffee are all you want. Finish off the day with a unique dessert wine if you like.

Katie Leede & Company Studio

Tip: Create mood lighting. Beautiful lighting is the key to hosting an outdoor party that really wows guests. And the wonderful thing is, it doesn’t need to be expensive! Line up hurricane lamps or tiki torches across a route, scatter tea lights on tables and hang lanterns and series lights overhead. If you’re worried about fire, stick with battery-powered candles rather than the real thing.

Spinnaker Development

8. Cocktails at dusk. Ask guests to arrive just as the sun is beginning to set for cocktails and small bites on the terrace. Since the sun dips lower, turn on the landscape clusters and lighting of candles on every surface.

Tell us What was the very best outdoor party you have ever had?

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Performed Through Special Occasions With Gracious Home, a Ready

It is simple (and not very pleasant) to get caught unprepared when guests stop by, or even to do nothing to bring to a wedding or housewarming. But with a little additional effort today, you can sail through all your spring and summer occasions easily.

From cleansing shortcuts and long-lasting flower structures to ideas for stocking the ideal gift cabinet, these 13 tips will help make you ready for casting parties, giving presents, writing thank-you notes, hosting unexpected guests and more.

Tres McKinney Design

1. Make an easy-clean entry with considerable storage. A chest of drawers or storage bench from the entry makes last-second tidying up simple. In a smaller space, try stashing stuff in lidded boxes beneath a slender console table or in French marketplace baskets hung on hooks.

Make a habit of keeping the surface of your own storage bit clear, aside from fresh blossoms or a blooming orchid, stowing everything else at the drawers beneath — that way it will always seem new when guests pop by.

Alice Lane Home Collection

2. Keep one cabinet devoted to parties. Never be stuck with no birthday candles again! Pick one place for all things party related: cake plates, fancy teacups, candles and matches, serving trays, the works.

Extra credit:
Learn one fancy fold technique and keep a pile of freshly laundered and folded cloth napkins in the ready.

3. Stock a cart with entertaining essentials. A cart is excellent for holding everything from glassware and paper napkins to bottles of wine and boxes of cheese straws. Keep yours stocked with a couple of favorite things, and it’s going to be simple to create snacks and beverages for buddies in a moment.

Extra credit: learn to make a signature drink, and keep the recipe card tucked off on your own cart.

4. Stow additional seating under a console. An easy way to squeeze in a couple of extra seats in the living space is by tucking a set of poufs or stools beneath a console desk — close at hand when you want them but readily tucked away.

Lux Decor

5. Create long-lasting (or perhaps faux) arrangements. Fresh flowers and greenery can go a long way toward making a room feel festive. Master a couple of simple arrangements which just look like they took ages to collect. Try lining up a series of little square containers down the middle of your dining table, filled with short-cut blossoms stuck into floral foam for strength.

Or, for everlasting green, pick up some high-quality faux topiaries and place them on your buffet.

Kerrisdale Design Inc

6. Get in the habit of picking up flowers in the market. If making fussy arrangements worries you vow instead to keep things clean and simple. Pick up single-color blossoms (white is always posh) in the grocery store or farmer’s market and plunk them at any vase or pitcher you have got. Large flowers (such as hydrangeas) and booming branches offer you a lot of bang for the dollar.

Tim Barber Ltd Architecture

7. Keep a stash of elaborate hand towels and soap at a bathroom cabinet. Toilet a mess when guests arrive? Duck in for a moment and pull the shower curtain closed, wipe out the faucet and mirror, and then put out fresh towels and soap.

Su Casa Designs

8. Bypass the mess and host last-minute guests outdoors. When the weather is good, entertaining outdoors can be a wonderful alternative. To keep outside cushions from becoming damp and filthy, try storing them at a bench outdoors where they’re still handy but secure.

Frederick + Frederick Architects

9. Make your kitchen attractive, guests will want to hang out while you cook. We might not all be able to have a dream kitchen such as the one shown here, but there is obviously a way to take advantage of what you have. Consider rolling out a true rug on the ground, pull up a few cute stools into the island and be sure speakers are useful for turning on some music while you cook.

Martha O’Hara Interiors

10. Always be ready with presents and wrapping supplies. Instead of picking themed gift wrap, try picking up an assortment of solid colors, together with an enjoyable variety of ribbons and trims. That way you can produce a number of different appearances for any occasion, all with the very same supplies.

Extra credit: Store a couple of go-to presents together with your wrapping supplies, for all those times when you are caught by surprise. Attempt to have something appropriate for baby, child, housewarming and wedding.

Christina Marie Interiors

11. Stock up on stationery for all occasions. Thank-you notes, clean cards and birthday cards must see you through almost any note-writing crisis.

Extra credit: Order personalized stationery with your name or monogram, and use it for all.

Tim Barber Ltd Architecture

12. Decide on a single place to note important dates and to-dos. Write down birthdays and special occasions, and notice presents you have received, so you will remember to thank the giver.

Extra credit: Store a book of quotes or famous toasts together with your calendar — if you’re asked to talk at a wedding, then you may at least know where to start.

Chandos Interiors

13. Get your guest room ready in minutes. First of all, keep the mattress made so that you do not need to worry about that. Next, dedicate a shelf in your linen closet to storing guest room essentials, so that you just have to catch the whole stack and go. Consider adding: a new set of towels, slippers, a robe and a little basket of toiletries that are spare.

Bonus: Stock the bedside table with intriguing books, books, chocolates and a carafe of water.

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A Modern Renovation at a Colonial-Era Town

English colonists came in Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1633; hence, the majority of the town’s housing inventory is anything but modern. When these homeowners, who lived in a very traditional home in Hingham, adored their preferred town, the wife longed for a modern house. So when this midcentury house went on the market for a teardown using a water view, the household snapped it up.

“The house was in such poor shape that we can not even show several before films,” says architect Don DiRocco of Hammer Architects. (Though see below for just one.) But, his group’s design saved a huge part of the home while they tore down the darkened and dark parts which didn’t get the job done. Both the new and old segments were designed to create a light, bright atmosphere that took complete advantage of their harbor views. The new home has an awareness of entrance; an easy, open stream; and a fresh kitchen hub for gathering cooking, holding cooking classes and doing homework.

at a Glance
Who lives here: A household with 4 children in high school and school
Location: Hingham, Massachusetts
Size: 5 bedrooms, 4 baths
Year built: Original house, 1950s; renovation, 2010

Hammer Architects

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They tore down the old garage and built a new one, along with a brand new breezeway that connects it to the new principal doorway and helps specify an entrance courtyard. “Before, the entrance to the home was tucked around the back of the home and was hard to locate,” DiRocco says. Now “there is not any longer any confusion regarding where to enter the home.” The door on the right is a second entrance that contributes to a large mudroom with cabinets to your kids’ sports gear, coats and shoes.

Before Photo

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“The original home had a set of strange intersecting gable roofs which caused escapes,” says DiRocco. “They had a small spiral stairs into the roof set up, because they had to move up there and repair it so often.” The house’s problems gave the architects good ideas about what to do. It had been “quite dark and dreary; it had a great water view that it was not taking advantage of,” DiRocco says.

Hammer Architects

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The architects added a new kitchen, a brand new garage and entrance courtyard, along with a brand new master suite, and reconfigured existing spaces (view the programs at the end to get a precise idea of these modifications). The attached greenhouse found in the previous photo was donated and carted away. On the right side of the photo you can see the brand new screened-in porch and master suite.

Hammer Architects

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“Occasionally negative existing aspects such as these inspire the new design. We added glass wherever we could, and the home is now filled with natural light from large windows and clerestories,” DiRocco says. This corner is your master bedroom, in which 6- by 3-foot windows take full advantage of the view of Hingham Harbor.

Hammer Architects

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Around the corner from the garage, big windows make the most of the water views. Exterior doors from the office/fifth bedroom and the living room link to the patio.

Hammer Architects

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Translucent glass on the garage doors expands the Japanese lantern–such as glow of the house at night.

Garage doors: Clopay Avante

Hammer Architects

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Red cedar tongue and groove clapboard siding has a natural stain that may stand up to the sea air and harsh winter climate. The house is well insulated and works nicely in summer, too. “This home can really breathe,” DiRocco says. “They’ve air-conditioning, but they seldom need to turn it on.”

Hammer Architects

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Wood beams and a tongue and groove ceiling are original to the home.

While the clients desired stairs down to a basement family room to be a part of their space, they desired to partly hide them. “We did not have much wall space on the first floor, because we wanted to depart the views as open as possible, so this was a good opportunity to include shelves,” DiRocco says.

Floors: stained walnut

Hammer Architects

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The kitchen is a completely new part of the home and serves as the heart of the house. The wife was a well-known chef in Boston and had a large, workable kitchen in which she could do some serious cooking and also have enough room to hold courses. The household also desired a multipurpose space for spending time together.

Appliances: Thermador; counter stools: Ikea; cabinets: custom, Ted Franklin, Welfleet, Massachusetts

Hammer Architects

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“The kitchen serves as a fantastic hub in the house; all these corridors meet here, and it’s a significant gathering spot. The family is quite tight-knit, and the children do their homework at this table,” DiRocco says.

“The kitchen has a high volume which pops up 14 feet and has wonderful natural light all day,” he says. Clerestory windows bring in light from three sides.

Pendant lighting: Ikea; faucet: Grohe Minta; counters: Surrell solid design in Arctic White, Formica; ceiling: tongue and groove fir

Hammer Architects

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The kitchen glows like a lantern at night.

Hammer Architects

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The long dining/living room goes all of the way into a sitting/TV viewing area which leads out into the patio. This component of the home was spared from the initial structure. All the windows are fresh and are larger than the originals.

Hammer Architects

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The architects also rescued the original large chimney and hearth found on the left. While dreaming of moving out of their traditional home for their new modern house, the owners knew they’d be starting fresh with new minimalist decor and furnishings.

The doors at the end of the room result in a screened-in porch, with the master suite beyond it.

Before Photo

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BEFORE: This is the plan of the existing home when the architects were hired. While the neighborhood was an enclave of quite small midcentury modern homes, most of the original homes have been torn down and replaced with big homes on account of the prime views.

Hammer Architects

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AFTER: This is the brand new plan of this home as it is today. “This home is a anomaly in Hingham,” says DiRocco. “The kids’ friends absolutely love hanging out here, the family loves the design, they continue to be within walking distance from downtown Hingham and live near their schools.”

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Happy Clients Unwrap a New Home on Christmas

Project supervisor Ben Cervantes pushed especially difficult for the rapid completion of this Santa Barbara, California, remodel. “My customers lost their cherished home of 30 years at the 2008 wildfires, therefore our staff and, of course, architect Richard Warner wanted to come through for them by finishing this home remodel by Christmas Day,” says Cervantes. And come through they did — the customers not only came home to a finished house, but more important, to a home with a seamless indoor-outdoor link and an expansive grand room filled with natural light.

in a Glance
Who lives here: A sociology professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a graphic designer and illustrator
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Size: 2,400 square feet

Allen Construction

Cervantes and his staff removed the home’s existing wood siding and replaced it with noncombustible plaster. The stucco exterior departs from the home’s origins as a midcentury ranch home, a sacrifice the customers were eager to make for the interest of safety.

The team also eliminated other poor connections — places at the home where embers can burn off, such as wood veneer along with other combustible exterior substances.

Roofing: fiber cement, Monier

Allen Construction

A large pivoting door greets guests in the entrance and connects the interior with the outside.

Flooring: solid white walnut, Old Tyme Floor

Before Photo

Allen Construction

BEFORE: The home had limited windows which didn’t maximize its verdant views. Partway through the remodel, the customers’ daughter seen the home and proposed creating an expansive living room by opening the living area, dining area and kitchen.

“It changed the scope of the remodel — and the budget — but our customers are more than happy with the results,” says Cervantes.

Allen Construction

AFTER: NanaWall doors open the interior to the outside. Cervantes and crew ran the electrical wiring which has been previously stored in the interior wall at a fresh beam running the length of this room.

Armchairs, couch, coffee table: Restoration Hardware

Allen Construction

One of the most significant challenges of this project was finding a way to encourage the roof following the team removed a load-bearing wall between the kitchen and living area.

In the end, the team kept two of the steel columns, but they weren’t very pleasant to check out. “One of our carpenters suggested cladding the columns with 3/4-inch white walnut to match the floors and kitchen cabinetry,” Cervantes says. “For decorative flair, in addition, he proposed adding an oak plinth block in the column bottom.” The exposed beams and pillar accentuate the room’s expansiveness.

Dining table, chairs: Restoration Hardware

Allen Construction

“We refaced both present fireplaces with dark grey plaster, then turning them to focal points on opposite sides of the room,” says Cervantes.

Armchair, couch: Pottery Barn

Before Photo

Allen Construction

BEFORE: The old wall divided the kitchen from the dining area and living area.

Allen Construction

AFTER: The team utilized the customers’ present appliances but applied a few cosmetic changes: The refrigerator had been refaced with 1/4-inch walnut plywood to match the brand new cabinets, the stove hood has been painted and framed, and Ceasarstone countertops and custom cabinetry were installed to get a warm timber and white kitchen.

New low-e (low emissivity) glass skylights drench the kitchen with lots of light. The low-e skylights are more energy efficient than the previous Plexiglas skylights; they block heat gain, reduce heat loss through the skylight and let in a cozy flow of light.

Bar stools: Crate & Barrel

Allen Construction

When the customers left the home to visit their daughter on Christmas Eve, scaffolding and construction supplies were strewn throughout. The couple had already give up the notion of spending Christmas Day at a finished home — but little did they know that a Christmas miracle was awaiting them upon their return. They arrived back to a spotless home: The scaffolding was gone and the painting was finished.

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Distinctive Edwardian 'Design Lab'

The house which designer Jay Jeffers shares his spouse, Michael Purdy, serves a double purpose: It is part escape and part design laboratory, nurturing creativity for Jeffers’ interior design business along with the pair’s San Francisco atelier, Cavalier. “Our house has mirrored my style evolution throughout the years,” says Jeffers, whose clients are often drawn to his vibrant, playful design touches. Architecturally, the house is tucked in a row of “handsome small Edwardians,” he states. But inside, it makes a daring departure from the remainder of the block.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Jay Jeffers and Michael Purdy
Location: Eureka Valley, San Francisco, California
Size: 2,500 square feet

JayJeffers

One of the first design lessons Jeffers provides his clients is that colour does not always mean vivid, splashy hues. “It is about creating new, unexpected pairings,” he states. “We just finished a gorgeous modern penthouse at a palette of grays and creams.”

Vintage tufted chairs in rich blue Holland & Sherry fabric complement the persimmon-stained walls.

JayJeffers

A floral lampshade with metallic trim almost looks like a framed watercolor bit next to an etching by Christopher Brown.

Wheel book weight: vintage, Coup d’Etat; wall paint: Persimmon, Benjamin Moore

JayJeffers

Gray trim highlights the molding in the dining area and provides a neutral complement into the bolder orange tones in the upholstery, decor and wall treatments. “I totally love the dining room,” Jeffers says. “It has a handsome, quirky appearance, with a gallery wall of portrait paintings”

Molding paint: Bear Creek, Benjamin Moore; wall paint: Pittsfield Buff, Benjamin Moore; dining table: vintage, Monteverdi Young; chandelier: vintage, Maitland Smith

JayJeffers

A Forrest Williams oil painting makes an alluring dialogue piece, including the illusion of another window within this living room sitting room. The settee is a custom piece by Jeffers.

Area rug: habit by Jay Jeffers & Kelly Hohla

JayJeffers

The kitchen was the only room in the home that really needed work — but that which designer stops following renovating just one room? Jeffers put into a tartan tile backsplash “√† la Burberry,” he states , and custom cabinets with back-painted glass.

“it is a clich√© to say, however, we are living in our kitchen,” he states. “The floor plan is circular, so that you can observe the kitchen from the dining area and living area, and guests always collect there. It is the ideal place for cooking — beef bourguignon, preferably — kicking back with a cocktail and glancing out in our view of the city”

JayJeffers

Like everything in Jeffers’ house, this tabletop vignette is meticulously curated.

“I’ve just started my first store, Cavalier, together with my spouse, and our focus with it’s on those kinds of carefully curated bits using a masculine edge,” says Jeffers.

JayJeffers

“I really put my stamp on the home. I believe the colour palette is what sets it apart and gives it its own distinct style notice,” he states.

JayJeffers

The guest area is swathed in acidity green wallpaper. “I am not sure anybody else on the block includes a sexy pink portrait of Abraham Lincoln,” Jeffers says.

Wallpaper: Studio Printworks; Abraham Lincoln screen-print: Natalie Ammirato

JayJeffers

This bedroom vignette combines handsome bits with quirkier things: An ornately framed mirror hangs over a vintage dresser, a sculptural bust adds gravitas into the corner and styled artwork stipulates a dash of whimsy.

JayJeffers

“This residence is my design laboratory,” says Jeffers. “It is where I crisscrossed pink and orange grosgrain ribbon in my master bedroom walls at one stage and hand-stencilled the drapes with my monogram in homage to Sir David Hicks.”

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“Did you ever think your house would burn down?” Eden, my afterward seven-year-old daughter asked me every few days, for months, after an arsonist randomly put our house on fire.

“No,” I’d answer each and every moment.

“I never thought my home would ever burn down,” she would say, shaking her head. Neither did I and, regardless of the fact we only marked the second anniversary, I can not quite believe it did.

There are hundreds of people in Colorado Springs who understand this feeling exactly.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

Last Wednesday (June 27, 2012), since the wildfires raged, while over 35,000 residents who were evacuated waited to figure out if their homes had been destroyed, my mind and my heart were left using them. It had been two years to the day of our very own fire.

Ours was set in the wee hours and we were home and in bed. My husband and I gathered our kids and the puppy and fled with the clothing on our backs. I stopped just to grab my notebook, which was at hand, and ran barefoot to the darkness.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

As we stumbled on the course across the road and watched the flame spread, what surprised me was the absence of pain, even when I knew everything was missing. I was in shock, true, but I was also clearer than I have ever been : “That” (our home and possessions) was things and may be substituted; my loved ones, standing beside me, alive and physically unharmed, was irreplaceable. I could live with no rest.

“We have been through worse.” I said repeatedly in the early days, and we had, but I didn’t understand trauma, and I didn’t understand that the flame was just the start.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

As the months and weeks passed, I couldn’t believe how hard it became. It had been such a surprise that getting somebody set fire to our house and losing all our possessions was not the most terrible part; it had been struggling against bureaucracy and creating each single financial decision — from what spatula to purchase to how big to build the home — while still traumatized and exhausted.

And in the early days, the horror of passion was mingled with and nearly covered with the extraordinary outpouring of service, the beautiful and astonishing generosity of our community.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

It started while our home was in flames, together with Paul’s (my husband’s) sister and brother-in-law scooping up us from the side of the road and welcoming us into their home, where we remained six weeks, catching our breath and planning the next step.

Very early, I called one of those pastors, who declared the fire in church. A buddy was given checks and money for us, there on the spot. Friends from college assembled another day to strategize our immediate, midterm and long-term demands. Our house was smoking when a local business was established as a drop-off place for donations.

Paul’s coworkers helped set up an account at our credit union and were collecting donations the following day. Many continued to watch out for us over the long year of rebuilding.

Neighbors, some we barely knew, stopped and handed us money or provided furniture, clothing, even a place to stay.

Friends and family at a distance called, sent care packages and wrote wonderful, adoring cards and mails.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

I asked Paul, more than once, “Does anybody understand we’re well insured? That we’ve got savings?” I didn’t have any idea how slow and hard insurance would be how fast we would go through our economies. It was embarrassing being the focus of much attention and, as strange as it sounds, I found overwhelming generosity — at times — simply overwhelming.

Here’s What Happens, and What You Can Do

Perhaps you have friends who lost their house in Colorado Springs, or one of those other regions affected by wildfires. If that’s the case, you might be longing to do some thing, and I’d really like to offer a couple suggestions.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

Message, text or email them your love and concern. Crisis is so isolating, and hearing that others understand what’s happening and that they care is wonderful. However keep it simple: “I’m so sorry for the loss. I’m so glad you’re alive.” There is actuallyn’t much else to say.

Listen. Everybody is going to have a unique response to this terrible event. Following our passion it seemed I was constantly out of step with all the prescribed story. When folks believed I should despair, I was hopeful. When others assumed things were looking up, I had been tanking. Your buddy, that (in case Colorado Springs) is surrounded by many others going through this exact same catastrophe, will require someone to just listen to how it is for her or him.

Send a test. This is one of the most helpful things you can do. Your friends are going to be spending money every which way, and insurance can take a while to process, even if everything goes smoothly.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

Send a gift certificate. Everybody in our household is a reader, so we have been given many gift certificates. Our books were one of the first things we wanted to replace. You can send a certificate to a favorite restaurant or a grocery shop.

Give clothes or home things. Be really thoughtful here. If they have been insured, your buddies will be given with all the family basics and might not be prepared to sort through a lot of stuff.

Make a meal or bring groceries. Your buddies are probably exhausted and struggling on many levels. Even if they are staying with people briefly, this could aid their hosts.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

If you are local, run a needed errand. Once I went on my very first shopping trip after the flame to obtain a pair of sandals, my regional mall didn’t have the style I wanted, but the mall on the opposite side of town. I was not able to take the opportunity to drive that way, but a friend discovered, purchased them and sent them right to me. It meant a lot better.

Concentrate on the kids. If kids are involved, it is complicated. Losing everything is particularly devastating for these; their belongings mean so much better. If you can, figure out a game or toy a kid is missing especially and get him or her immediately. You will have done a great thing for the entire family.

Consider taking the long term. The procedure after a flame is extended. You might choose to check in during the rebuild and do any of the above a couple of months down the road when they might require it most.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

Do you have friends who had to flee, but their home lived? They’ve been through a terrible ordeal also and are likely feeling wrecked. Pick anything on the listing and I’m positive it will greatly appreciated.

Don’t know anybody personally, but wish to help?

The American Red Cross Disaster Relief does good work. They help people in crisis undergo the first 48 hours after a catastrophe with money for food, shelter and clothing. Find out more at redcross.org or even 1-800-RED-CROSS. Folks can also text “REDCROSS” to 90999 to create a $10 donation.

The Humane Society for the Pikes Peak Region took in hundreds of pets belonging to Colorado Springs evacuees and always needs assistance.

Sandi Gunnett Photography

When we watched our home for the very first time after the fire, I told Paul, “I never need to stop being grateful we lived. I don’t understand how things are going to go with insurance, I am aware that it may get stressful, but I never wish to get past gratitude.”

An argument may be made I did.

But once I think about the goodness of our community, the astounding kindness and overflowing generosity that surrounded and buoyed us I know I didn’t and I never will.

Photographs of the author’s home after the flame by Sandi Gunnett

More: Simple Acts — The Unsung Power of a Fantastic Neighbor

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Summer Living: How to Welcome Weekend Guests

Being a good host is something of a lost art. Assessing the roles of tour guide, innkeeper, cook and friend (while still managing to have fun yourself) could be challenging, to say the very least.

Make seeing family and friends feel at home, and ease the load on your own, this summer with a little extra preparation. Read on for a dozen methods to welcome guests, and also make weekend visits more fun.

Dreamy Whites

Supply a grab-and-go breakfast channel. Maintain fresh fruit, breakfast cereals and other essentials together on the counter for early risers. Give guests a fast kitchen tour the night before so they can get their morning coffee or tea without waiting for you.

If you would like to set an extra-special table or surprise that a birthday guest, then including a monogrammed mug along with a small arrangement of flowers is lovely and doesn’t require much extra effort.

Tim Cuppett Architects

Establish a casual tone. I’m not saying you should not clean up a bit before guests arrive, but keeping things near the typical state of things around the house will help guests at ease. Newspapers on the coffee table, flip flops piled from the door and music in the background set the stage for comfort.

Jennifer Grey Interiors Design & Color Specialist

Ask ahead about favorites and patterns. Check beforehand to see exactly what your weekend guests typically eat for breakfast, lunch, or if they have any particular food or drink requests or allergies. Picking up a couple of things especially for your guests is a nice touch and isn’t any problem — it just requires thinking ahead a bit.

Katerina Tana Design

Prep your front porch. It is the very first thing guests see, after all, so make sure it is well lit, freshly swept and equipped with fresh cushions and green plants.

Richard Bubnowski Design LLC

Stock bedrooms with essentials. Clean sheets and extra pillows are a no-brainer, but try adding a few of those extras to carry it to another level:
iPod dock with speakers
Small alarm clockVintage house or fashion magazinesAn electric tea kettleSmall basket with sample-size toiletriesLocal travel guide

Make young guests feel at home. Make the stay in a new location easier on small ones by creating their mattress fresh and inviting and stocking their room with some of your favourite childhood toys.

Be sure to request parents of young children beforehand if there is anything you can have ready for them borrowing a top chair from a friend, for example, signifies the grownups can pack lighter.

Witt Construction

Allow for downtime. It is all too easy to fall into the trap of overplanning actions for weekend guests. Possessing a few tentative outings or projects on the schedule can be helpful, but avoid the desire to fill every last minute. Most guests will really enjoy some blocks of unstructured time to unwind, talk, read, rest or perhaps venture out on their own.

Kate

Give guests a project in the kitchen. When dinnertime rolls around, don’t hesitate to have guests toss in with a few simple tasks in the kitchen. Ask them to pour the wine, then choose the songs, prep greens for a salad or set the table, and soon your visitors will be feeling right at home.

A Beach Cottage

Eat alfresco. Eating outside makes meals tastier, conversation livelier and individuals more relaxed. Even in the event that you don’t have an outdoor table, think about carrying your kitchen table out for the day. It will make for a memorable night.

Ellen Kennon Design

Offer old-school entertainment. Together with the oversaturation of high-tech gadgets in our lives these days, it can feel very refreshing (and even indulgent) to unplug for a day. Play board games or cards, perform on a significant mystery, read, speak, go for a stroll, ride bicycles or swim.

Greige

Leather Handled Market Tote – $39

Fill baskets with outing essentials. I love the idea of keeping baskets from the door, ready to go for excursions that are ordinary. You could have a beach basket with sunscreen, towels and spare sunglasses, or even a picnic basket with blankets, cutlery and unbreakable dishes. Just grab the proper tote and head out!

Frederick + Frederick Architects

Reconnect in the end of the day. Even if you and your customers part ways through the day, it can be nice to regroup and reunite together in the end of the day. Make a ritual of snacks and drinks to the backyard or on the porch and sharing stories from your day.

Inform us: How do you prepare for weekend guests? Have any fun activity ideas? Share them in the comments section!

More:
Impress Your Guests: 8 Tips for Gracious Guest Rooms
Creating the Perfect Guest Room
Your Guest Bath: Creating Your Friends Feel Pampered

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